Blog Archives

T-Rex Replica Delay Review

RGS-TREX-REP-4I’m going to say the only bad thing about this pedal at the start: it’s a horrible shade of brown. The highest end of high end delay pedals; this is a digital pedal by day and ninja analog pedal by night. It isn’t really overloaded with features and it doesn’t have much variety in sound, however, the idea here was to do one thing, but do it completely right. Trust me when I tell you that this delay is the clearest, the warmest, the most refined and one of the easiest to use delay pedals. Despite being a digital delay pedal, it can emulate the analog delay sounds with (literally) a flick of the switch. (Want to know the difference? Click here)

It has the basic features of any delay pedal, including a tap tempo. It has an Echo knob, which controls the volume of the effected signal (the volume of echoes), a Level knob, which controls the output volume, a Repeats knob, which controls how many repeats are going to happen, and finally a Tempo knob, that controls the speed of repeats. It has one footswitch to switch the pedal on/off and another footswitch for tapping in the tempo, which has a LED light that blinks along with the tempo. It also has an input gain control built on the side. It has two small switches on its body. One is the heavenly ‘Brown’ switch that makes your delay sound supermushy and smooth at the same time. The other is the ‘Subdivision’ switch that lets you split your delay into ¼ note triplets. It is powered by a 9 volt adapter. Oh yes…and need I mention it has true bypass? (When it is off, it won’t affect your signal even slightly)

The sound quality here is so mind-blowing, that the pedal can make you believe that you are somewhat, almost, perhaps- David Gilmour (just for a second…don’t get too excited). The absolute crystal clarity with the Brown switch disengaged and the melting waves of warm tube delay with it engaged are two very pristine and high quality sounds. This is one of the few pedals that actually don’t even remotely touch your clean guitar sound. It is built with a quality that adds absolutely no unwanted colour to your sound.

Replica_back-1229269cbeb4f029a6cdb9f8aac4e95cMy favourite mode is with the Brown switch engaged. You get such a characteristic and virtually analog sound that fits in with any style of playing. You can even sit alone for hours, tripping on the beautiful, all encompassing delay (think Run Like Hell by Pink Floyd). The depth of the repeats and the darkening of the delay at each successive repeat are very distinct and lend that old-world charm to your most futuristic delay sounds. You can choose to leave it on the whole time and hear the way your tone becomes more powerful, or you could use it for quick, easy and powerful tone sculpting; either way you wont go wrong with this pedal.

Granted it is very expensive (Rs 28,025) and perhaps out of reach for the amateur player, it is a one time investment that will be totally worth it. So if you got the moolah, then don’t even bother looking anywhere else.

What we liked- 1.Stunning delay sound, 2.Ease of use, 3.Tap Tempo, 4.Choice between analog and digital delay sounds

What we didn’t like- 1.Price! 2.Lack of other modes like reverse echo, 3.Lack of modulation, 4.The colour

Verdict- Rob a bank if you have to and get this. You won’t be disappointed, if you want the most beautiful sounding no-nonsense delay pedal that will last you a lifetime. Available at Bhargava’s Musik stores in Mumbai

Rating- 5/5 (Sexbomb)

Alternatives- Way Huge Supa Puss, Roland Space Echo (Who am I kidding? These others will do the job but won’t sound as pristine as the replica)

Advertisements

Your digital has a beef with my analog

Vector-Background-YellowPink-StarA lot of highly exciting things have happened in music technology and have been happening for a very long time. Watch Sound City: a beautiful documentary about the legendary Sound City studios, which had to shut down because it couldn’t compete with the advent of modern recording technology. It is a tragic story for some but to some it is the onset of new and exciting ways to make music. In essence some like the rawness of music and some like the sophistication. What I am talking about is the struggle that every musician faces at some point: the question of digital versus analog sound. Through the course of this article I want to explore both approaches and clear up a few things along the way.

So, most musicians know that analog sounds are warmer whereas digital sounds are clearer, and in this regard it is each to his/her own. The kinds of music one wants to play usually determines which kinds of sounds one uses. To give a few examples, Jack White is a firm believer in the analog way of doing things, whereas Trent Reznor has been using digital tools to great effect for very long. Listen to their records and you will see the difference as clearly as possible. Many musicians believe that an analog sound has a closer relationship to the musician. The rawness of having just a musician and his talent to help him is the attractiveness. Digital on the other hand can provide you with great levels of finesse and help you to hone the rawness into clear sounds.

Both ideas and schools of thought have their own power and can be used very beautifully by any musician. One needs to identify the right method of using them. Now before we proceed any further, lets just be clear on a point: any kind of a sound, be it analog or digital is just like an instrument- you need to know how to play one.

In guitars, for example, the popular way to get effects in to your sound is by using a digital signal processor. Or as some people call it: Multi-Effect pedals. Many musicians, especially in India, love using them. They are convenient and can do just about anything there is to do with guitars. You don’t need an amplifier; you can just plug in and go. They have a wide variety of sounds ranging from the bizarre to the usual. Now these processors have a certain kind  of sound and one needs to use those sounds as a tool for the music one makes. Many a time I have heard from a whole bunch of musicians that “digital is shit” and other such sentiments. This however is not really true. It only depends upon what one decides to play. If I wanted to play Nine Inch Nails or other such industrial or electro stuff, there’s nothing like digital processing to give you highly complex and many-layered sounds. I wouldn’t play the blues like that though.

The choice, at some point, becomes a bit genre specific. However, one must also understand that genres in today’s world, don’t mean very much. No one is really afraid to experiment around genres anymore and the album Odd Soul by Mute Math actually goes out and slams my previous statement about blues and digital sounds to the ground.

Experimentation is really the key here. I am a convert from digital to analog, but both sounds never cease to impress me. Now there are digital processors that can sound indistinguishably analog and analog processors that can do some really wild stuff. Your sound could be found by just a little experimentation and research. And of course one mustn’t be afraid to mix and match as well.

I’m pretty sure you can distill this article into the phrase: ‘Try Before Buy’, but I’m also sure you knew that already.